Relationship between force and distance in power equation

What is the relationship between force and distance? | How Things Fly

relationship between force and distance in power equation

When a force is applied over a certain distance, that force does . To "come up" with the relationship, all you have to do is divide one equation. In physics, force is the energy required to move an object, and distance is how far the object travels. Work only occurs when a displacement of distance has. Jan 9, Work and power Cara- Physics: What is the Relationship Between Force, Work and Displacement? Displacement is the distance and direction an object is moved. Force The equation showing the relationship is W= Fd. W represents work measured in joules; F represents force in newtons; and d.

Power is the rate at which work is done. Mathematically, it is computed using the following equation. As is implied by the equation for power, a unit of power is equivalent to a unit of work divided by a unit of time.

For historical reasons, the horsepower is occasionally used to describe the power delivered by a machine. One horsepower is equivalent to approximately Watts. Most machines are designed and built to do work on objects. All machines are typically described by a power rating.

The power rating indicates the rate at which that machine can do work upon other objects. A car engine is an example of a machine that is given a power rating. The power rating relates to how rapidly the car can accelerate the car. If this were the case, then a car with four times the horsepower could do the same amount of work in one-fourth the time. The point is that for the same amount of work, power and time are inversely proportional. The power equation suggests that a more powerful engine can do the same amount of work in less time.

A person is also a machine that has a power rating. Some people are more power-full than others. That is, some people are capable of doing the same amount of work in less time or more work in the same amount of time. A common physics lab involves quickly climbing a flight of stairs and using mass, height and time information to determine a student's personal power. Despite the diagonal motion along the staircase, it is often assumed that the horizontal motion is constant and all the force from the steps is used to elevate the student upward at a constant speed.

Thus, the weight of the student is equal to the force that does the work on the student and the height of the staircase is the upward displacement. Suppose that Ben Pumpiniron elevates his kg body up the 2. If this were the case, then we could calculate Ben's power rating.

This is simply how we define a duration of time. The quantities t1 and t2 represent two events with 1 being first.

The difference in the two time measurements represents a duration of time. Typically, this is measured in seconds, but always in units of time.

This is simply how we define a displacement in the x-direction. The quantities x1 and x2 represent two positions with 1 being the starting location, and 2 being the ending location. The difference in the two position measurements measured from some common reference point - usually the origin point, or zero represents a change in position.

Typically, this is measured in meters, but always in units of distance. The sign of the value designates a direction positive or negative x. This is just a generic version of the above equation, using the variable d to represent some displacement in normal, three-dimensional space. This is also measured in units of distance. The sign of this number simply denotes whether the displacement was away from positive or toward negative the origin of measurement.

Average velocity, measured in units of distance per unit time typically, meters per secondis the average distance traveled during some time interval. If the object moves with a constant velocity, it will have the same average velocity during all time durations. When examining an object's displacement-time graph, the slope of a line is equal to the average velocity of the object.

If the object's displacement-time graph is a straight line itself, then the object is traveling with a constant velocity. If the graph is not a straight line i. This is just an equation relating the three main ways average acceleration is expressed in equations.

Remember that if the object has a constant acceleration, its average acceleration is the exact same value. Average acceleration, measured in units of distance per time-squared typically, meters per second per secondis the average rate at which an object's velocity changes over a given time interval.

This tells us how quickly the object speeds up, slows down, or changes direction only. This equation is both the definition of average acceleration and the fact that it is the slope of a velocity-time graph. Like velocity, if the graph is not a straight line then the acceleration is not constant. This is a simple re-write of the definition of acceleration. It is useful when solving for the final velocity of an object with a known initial velocity and constant acceleration over some time interval.

Calculating the Gravitational Force

If an object goes from an initial velocity to a final velocity, undergoing constant acceleration, you can simply "average" the two velocities this way. This is particularly helpful and easy to use if you know that it starts with zero velocity just divide the final velocity in half.

This is a simple re-write of the old distance-equals-rate-times-time formula with average velocity defined as above. This is a very important formula for later use. It can be used to calculate an object's displacement using initial velocity, constant acceleration, and time.

Though a bit more complex looking, this equation is really an excellent way to find final velocity knowing only initial velocity, average acceleration, and displacement.

Don't forget to take the square-root to finish solving for vf. This equation is the definition of a vector in this case, the vector A through its vertical and horizontal components.

What is the relationship between force and distance in the power equation?

Recall that x is horizontal and y is vertical. This equation relates the lengths of the vector and its components. It is taken directly from the Pythagorean theorem relating the side lengths of a right triangle. The length of a vector's horizontal component can be found by knowing the length of the vector and the angle it makes with the positive-x axis in this case, the Greek letter theta.

what is the relationship between force and distance in the power equation? | Yahoo Answers

The length of a vector's vertical component can be found by knowing the length of the vector and the angle it makes with the positive-x axis in this case, the Greek letter theta.

Because the components of a vector are perpendicular to each other, and they form a right triangle with the vector as the hypotenuse, the tangent of the vector's angle with the positive-x axis is equal to the ratio of the vertical component length to the horizontal component length. This is useful for calculating the angle that a vector is pointed when only the components are known. This is Newton's Second Law, written as a definition of the term "force".

Simply put, a force is what is required to cause a mass to accelerate. Since 'g' is already a negative value, we don't have to mess around with putting a negative to show direction down is negative in our x-y reference frame. Through experimentation, physicists came to learn that the frictional force between two surfaces depends on two things: These two factors are seen here in this equation: Since both are positive, we must include a negative to account for friction's oppositional nature always goes against motion.

Another way to interpret Newton's 2nd Law is to say that the net sum total force on an object is what causes its acceleration. Hence, there may be any number of forces acting on an object, but it is the resultant of all of them that actually causes any acceleration. Remember, however, that these are force vectors, not just numbers. We must add them just as we would add vectors.

relationship between force and distance in power equation

A simple if-then statement that holds true due to Newton's 2nd Law. If the mass is not accelerated meaning: This is not to say that there is no force acting on it, just that the sum total of all the forces acting on it is equal to zero -- all the forces "cancel out".

relationship between force and distance in power equation

Since force is a vector, I can simply focus on its components when I wish. So, if I have a series of forces acting on a mass, the sum of their x-components must be equal to the x-component of the net force on the mass.

And, by Newton's 2nd Law, this must be equal to the mass times the x-component of the acceleration since mass has no direction, and acceleration is also a vector. Similarly as above, if I have a series of forces acting on a mass, the sum of their y-components must be equal to the y-component of the net force on the mass.

And, by Newton's 2nd Law, this must be equal to the mass times the y-component of the acceleration since mass has no direction, and acceleration is also a vector. If we calculate or just know the x- and y-components of the net force acting on an object, it is a snap to find the total net force.

As with any vector, it is merely the sum of its components added together like a right triangle, of course. This equation becomes ridiculously easy to use if either one of the components is zero. The definition of momentum is simply mass times velocity. Take note that an object can have different velocities measured from different reference frames.

relationship between force and distance in power equation

Newton's 2nd Law re-written as an expression of momentum change. This is actually how Newton first thought of his law.